Last updated on: 11/21/2008 | Author: ProCon.org

William C. Rhoden Biography

Title:
Sports Columnist at the New York Times
Position:
Not Clearly Pro or Con to the question "Should Performance Enhancing Drugs (Such as Steroids) Be Accepted in Sports?"
Reasoning:

“In the N.F.L., where there is no test for human-growth hormone and players are as big as buildings, attendance is soaring. We have not come close to determining the extent of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball. Yet, despite the disclosures and innuendo, fans are flocking to baseball games in record numbers. Where’s the outrage? There is none…

I’m not saying that fans don’t care. I think they do, but not passionately enough to stay away from the ballpark, perhaps in some noble recognition that the game is larger than the individual, even one who trespasses. These allegations represent an assault on the public trust. But the pull of the home team is much stronger than indignation over a scourge that we don’t truly comprehend. Fan sensibilities have not been offended as much as they’ve been anesthetized.”

“Fans Tolerate Doping, and Media Remain Riveted,” New York Times, May 26, 2007

Theoretical Expertise Ranking:
  Organizations/VIPs/Others
Individuals and organizations that do not fit into the other star categories.
Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Sports Columnist, New York Times, 1983-present
  • Consultant, SportsCentury, ESPN
  • Writer, Journey of the African-American Athlete, Documentary, TV – HBO Sports, 1997
  • Recipient, Peabody for Broadcasting Awards for his work on the Journey of the African-American Athlete, 1997
  • Columnist, Baltimore Sun, 1978-1983
  • Associate Editor, Ebony, 1974-1978
Education:
  • BA, Liberal Arts, Morgan State University, 1973
Other:
  • None found
Quoted in:
  1. Would Allowing Performance Enhancing Drugs in Sports Decrease Fan Turnout, Revenue, and Corporate Sponsorship?