Last updated on: 11/3/2008 | Author: ProCon.org

Robert Housman, JD Biography

Title:
Partner at Book Hill Partners consulting firm
Position:
Con to the question "Should Performance Enhancing Drugs (Such as Steroids) Be Accepted in Sports?"
Reasoning:

“Performance-enhancing drugs seriously risk the health and safety of users, especially young people. The risks of steroid use include: elevated cholesterol levels, increased incidence of heart disease, addiction, serious liver damage, sex-trait changes and often severe behavioral changes, particularly heightened aggressiveness. No victory is worth the damage these substances do to a person – just ask the parents who told the hearing their children committed suicide because of steroid use. Stars who use these dangerous drugs set a deadly example for children.”

“Steroids and the Feds,” Washington Times, Apr. 6, 2005

Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Partner, Book Hill Partners, Dec. 2007-present
  • Adjunct Professor, Counter-Terrorism and Homeland Security, University of Maryland, University College, Jan. 2006-present
  • Board of Directors, Taylor Hooton Foundation
  • Principal, Housman Group, May 2005-Dec. 2007
  • Former Senior Vice President, Fleishman-Hillard Government Relations (FHGR)
  • Counsel, Government Relations, Bracewell & Patterson, Feb. 2001-May 2004
  • Assistant Director, Strategic Planning, White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), 1997-2001
  • Former Senior Advisor at large to General Barry McCaffrey
  • Co-Counsel, International Audit Team, Sydney Olympic Games, 2000
  • Member, President’s delegation to Venezuela and the United Nations General Assembly Special Session, 1998
  • Former Member, White House Olympic Task Force
  • Former Member, White House Task Force on the Reforming the Safe and Drug Free Schools Program
  • Former Deputy Head, US Delegation to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)
Education:
  • JD, Washington College of Law, American University, 1990
  • BA, Government, Saint Lawrence University, 1987
Other:
  • None found
Quoted in:
  1. Should Performance Enhancing Drugs (Such as Steroids) Be Accepted in Sports?
  2. Should the US Congress Be Involved in Setting Drug Policies for Professional Sports?