Last updated on: 12/11/2008 | Author: ProCon.org

Paul Finkelman, PhD Biography

Title:
President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy at Albany Law School
Position:
Con to the question "Should Performance Enhancing Drugs (Such as Steroids) Be Accepted in Sports?"
Reasoning:

“I would love to see steroids banned from sports. They are unhealthy and physically dangerous. They are a Faustian bargain – offering immediate success for the price of an athlete’s body, if not his or her soul. Worse yet, young kids who have no judgment and only see the glory of a Bonds home run are rushing to use them. In the process they are jeopardizing their health to make the team, get the college scholarship, and maybe make it to the pros.”

“Baseball, Steroids, Bonds, and Balco,” The Huffington Post, Dec. 11, 2007

Theoretical Expertise Ranking:
    Experts
Individuals with MDs, JDs, PhDs, or equivalent advanced degrees in fields relevant to performance enhancing drugs and sports. Also top-level government officials (such as foreign leaders, US presidents, Founding Fathers, Supreme Court Justices, members of legislative bodies, cabinet members, military leaders, etc.) with positions relevant to performance enhancing drugs and sports.
Involvement and Affiliations:
  • President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy, Albany Law School (Endowed Chair), 2006-present
  • Board Member, Gilder Lehman Center for the Study of Slavery, Abolition, and Resistance, Yale University, 2003-present
  • Recipient, Albany Law School Award for Distinguished Scholarship, 2007
  • Scholar in Residence, University of Seattle School of Law, 2007
  • Residential Research Fellowship, Gilder Lehman Center for the Study of Slavery, Abolition, and Resistance, Yale University, 2006
  • Research Fellowship, The Gilder Lehrman Institute, New York City, 2006
  • Former Chapman Distinguished Professor of Law, University of Tulsa College of Law, 1999-2006
  • Scholar in Residence, John Marshall College of Law, Chicago, 2005
  • Scholar in Residence, The Center for Inquiry, New York, 2005
  • Research Fellowship, University of Michigan, 2005
  • Former John F. Seiberling Professor (Endowed Chair), University of Akron School of Law, 1998-1999
  • Baker & Hostetler Visiting Professor, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, 1997-1998
  • Distinguished Visiting Professor, Hamline Law School, 1997
  • Charlton W. Tebeau Visiting Research Professor (Endowed Chair), University of Miami, 1996
  • Fellow in Law and Humanities, Harvard Law School, 1982-83
Education:
  • PhD, University of Chicago, 1976
  • MA, University of Chicago, 1972
  • BA, Syracuse University, 1971
Other:
  • Expert for plaintiff in 2002 lawsuit over the ownership of the 73rd home run ball hit by Barry Bonds, Popov v. Hayashi (Supreme Court, San Francisco, CA)
Quoted in:
  1. Should Performance Enhancing Drugs (Such as Steroids) Be Accepted in Sports?
  2. Should Steroid Use Be Accepted in Sports?